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A Worldview, Everyone Has One

Whether aware or unaware, every person has a particular type of worldview—it is unavoidable. An individual worldview is a collection of all you believe to be true and what you believe turns out to be the motivating drive behind every feeling, choice and deed. It is a total commitment to an all-consuming way of living one’s life.

A worldview proposes an all-inclusive interpretation of every facet of creation. You behave according to your worldview. One’s choices are created by one’s worldview. The objective is to be certain that one’s “system of beliefs” is grounded entirely in the Word of God, i.e., to live on a DAILY basis in agreement with God’s will!

A Biblical World-System of Absolute Beliefs & Lifestyle

Ohio Valley University’s Metadisciplinary Studies Honors Program is a one-of-a-kind learning environment that teaches a Biblical Worldview Curriculum as a comprehensive, coherent, and objective system of truth. It is based on the infallible, inerrant, and authoritative written Word of God, which is the only absolute and objective foundation for thinking, learning, belief, and the only imperative for correct living. The Biblical Worldview Curriculum is genuinely committed to the fact that in Jesus Christ “are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:2-3).

The MDS Honors Biblical Worldview Curriculum transforms and nurtures the entire student’s intellectual, spiritual, emotional, social, and vocational characteristics in becoming an authentic human being, i.e., a Christian. It is the instrument by which students explain and judge reality. The Biblical Worldview Curriculum is an articulate approach of understanding life and of seeing the world—a curriculum of everything—that sets the stage for Jesus’ virgin birth (conception), His Gospel, His Church, His directive and promise of the Great Commission to restore broken lives that encompass the world (Matthew 29:19-20; Mark 16:15-16), and His literal second coming!

The MDS Honors Biblical Worldview Curriculum advances an all-embracing integration of the whole counsel of God (Acts 20:27) that is comprised of:  1) the Bible; 2) a systematic understanding of “sound doctrine” that the apostle Paul commanded all Christians to believe and live by (2 Timothy 1:13; 2:15; 4:3-5, 16); and Classical Apologetics whereby to defend the historic Christian faith. These three “meta-disciplines” are integrated within and transform world history, linguistics, literature, jurisprudence, philosophy, archaeology, comparative religions, ethics, the arts (visual, fine & performing), the physical and social sciences—of all historical time periods.

The Biblical Worldview Curriculum is not religion; it’s reality! It is truly an Itinerarium Mentis ad Deum (“a journey of the mind of God”)!

The Breakdown of the Biblical Worldview Curriculum (BWC)

Freshman Fall Semester - MDS 1 (HNRS 110)

This four-hour course is a systematic, comprehensive, and meta-integration of the isagogics of history, religion, ethics, literature, philosophy, the science of archaeology, politics, government, business, military, warfare, language, geography, law, art, architecture, sculpture, education, social sciences, and natural sciences—produced by the Hebrews, Egyptians, Aegeans (Greeks), Chinese (Han Dynasty), and the Romans—with the locus being on the Life of Christ. This course is comprised of the following divisions.

  1. the pre-epistemic historical and cultural backgrounds of the Hebrews, Egyptians, Aegeans (Greeks), Chinese (Han Dynasty), and the Romans—in preparation for the birth of Jesus;
  2. the exploration of the historical and thematic content of the four Gospels (Matthew, Luke, Mark & John) along with a Harmony of the Four Gospels with practical and ethical applications; and
  3. the post-historical consequences of Jesus’ birth—such as Jesus’ 3 ½ year ministry; the Gospel (Jesus’ death, honorable burial, physical resurrection, physical appearances); creation of the Church in AD 30; Christianity vs. Judaism (Saul of Tarsus); Global Christianization (Church Planting) vs. Romanization (City, Architectural & Engineering Planting); Christianity vs. the Julio-Claudian and Flavian Dynasties; the Burning of Rome in AD 64; the Destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70; the Dead Sea Scrolls; and the Imperial Death Edict of Domitian: Dominus et Deus—Who is Lord and God, Jesus or the Roman Emperor?

    This course will also examine the implications of the science of Textual Criticism of the New Testament documents.

Original texts will be used in reading and studying original documents and artifacts from these cultures that will expose students to multiple frames of reference. MDS 1 (HNRS 110) is offered during the freshman fall semester.

Freshman Spring Semester - MDS 2 (HNRS 111)

This four-hour course is a systematic, comprehensive, and meta-integration of the isagogics of history, religion, ethics, literature, philosophy, the science of archaeology, politics, government, business, military, warfare, language, geography, law, art, architecture, sculpture, education, social sciences, and natural sciences—produced by those of the Patristic Age/the Early Middle Ages through the High Middle Ages, and by those of the Italian & High Renaissance—with the locus being on the reinterpretation of the New Testament books of Acts through the Revelation from the Biblical authors’ original and intended meaning. This course is comprised of the following divisions.

  1. the pre-epistemic historical and cultural backgrounds of the Apostolic Age (AD 30-100)—that by the inspiration of God the Holy Spirit the Biblical books of Acts, the Epistles, and the Revelation, were written without error and not subject to be reinterpreted/changed from the Biblical authors’ original intended meaning;
  2. the exploration of the historical and thematic content of the book of Acts, the Epistles, and the Revelation—with practical and ethical applications; and
  3. the post-historical consequences of the reinterpretation of the New Testament books of Acts through the Revelation from the Biblical authors’ original intended meaning—such as the rise of the Monarchical Episcopate (the Pope), the fabrications of infant baptism and original sin, Monasticism, the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the rise of Roman Catholicism, the rise of the Medieval West, the rise of Islam, the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire/Eastern Roman Empire, Scholasticism, and The Council of Trent.

    This course will also examine the Visual Arts (Painting, Sculpture & Architecture) and the implications of the rise of the modern town and business.

Original texts will be used in reading and studying original documents and artifacts from these cultures that will expose students to multiple frames of references. MDS 2 (HNRS 111) is offered during the freshman spring semester.

Sophomore Fall Semester - MDS 3 (HNRS 210)

This four-hour course is a systematic, comprehensive, and meta-integration of the isagogics of history, psychology, religion, ethics, literature, philosophy, the science of archaeology, politics, government, business, military, warfare, language, geography, law, art, architecture, sculpture, education, social sciences, and natural sciences—produced by those of the Reformation; Early Mannerism; Northern Humanism and Baroque; by those of the Scientific, American, French & Industrial Revolutions; and by those of the Enlightenment/Age of Reason—with the locus being on Christian Thought/Ethics (Biblical doctrines/Christian conduct/living). This course is comprised of the following divisions.

  1. the pre-epistemic historical and cultural backgrounds of the Patristic Age/the Middle Ages through the High Middle Ages, and of the Italian & High Renaissance —that reinterpreted/changed the New Testament books of Acts through the Revelation from the Biblical authors’ original intended meaning;
  2. the systematic exploration of the historical and thematic content of Christian Thought/Ethics (Bible Doctrines/Ethics)—with practical and ethical applications; and
  3. the post-historical consequences of reinterpreting Christian Thought (Bible Doctrines)— such as the rise of the Protestant Monarchical Episcopate (the Pastor), Protestant denominations—such as the Lutherans, Calvinists, Zwingalians, Baptists, and Methodists; the implications of the Scientific, Political & Industrial Revolutions; the Enlightenment/Age of Reason; and Political Thought—all setting the stage for the Restoration Movement.

    This course will also examine in detail the American Revolution.

Original texts will be used in reading and studying original documents and artifacts from these cultures that will expose students to multiple frames of references. MDS 3 (HNRS 210) is offered during the sophomore fall semester.

Sophomore Spring Semester - MDS 4 (HNRS 211)

This four-hour course is a systematic, comprehensive, and meta-integration of the isagogics of history, psychology, religion, ethics, literature, philosophy, the science of archaeology, politics, government, business, military, warfare, language, geography, law, art, architecture, sculpture, education, social sciences, and natural sciences—produced by those of the Romantic, Modernism, and Postmodernism periods—with the locus being on the Old Testament. This course is comprised of the following divisions.

  1. the pre-epistemic historical and cultural backgrounds of the Protestant denominations of the Reformation; the Scientific, Political & Industrial Revolutions; and the Enlightenment/Age of Reason—that reinterpreted/changed Christian Thought/Ethics (the Biblical doctrines & Christian Conduct/Living) from the Biblical authors’ original intended meaning;
  2. the exploration of the historical and thematic content of the Old Testament with practical and ethical applications; and
  3. the post-historical consequences of reinterpreting and rejecting the Old Testament from the Biblical authors’ original intended meaning—such as the rise of Darwinian Evolution; Marxism/Communism; Liberalism; the Cults; the Death of God Movement; Decadent Literature; Socialism; Pragmatism; World War I & II; Neo-orthodoxy; the New Hermeneutic/Reader-Response Criticism; Mass Culture (Movies & Sports); Liberation/Feminist Theology; Korea & Vietnam; the Postmodernists; Political Liberalism; and the Progressives.

    This course will also explore the Fine & Performing Arts, Evangelicalism, the Space Age, The Technology-Information-Explanation Age, and Global Terrorism.

Original texts will be used in reading and studying original documents and artifacts from these cultures that will expose students to multiple frames of references. MDS 4 (HNRS 211) is offered during the sophomore spring semester.

Junior Fall Semester - MDS 5 (HNRS 310) – Capstone Thesis/Project

The MDS Honors Capstone Thesis/Project is the climaxing academic experience for all Metadisciplinary Studies Honors students. The capstone thesis/project is not a course, but weekly sessions of a minimum of one hour a week during four semesters with the MDS Honors Director and the student’s Primary Mentor.

The Capstone Thesis/Project is an opportunity to conduct extensive, continuous, and original meta-research engaging in a creative metadisciplinary thesis or project in the student’s area of interest and specialization. With faculty guidance, students are expected to conduct research and demonstrate thesis-writing skills and/or project management skills, in producing an original thesis and/or written technical report or analysis of a project, and to provide a presentation summarizing the scope and results of their work.

The MDS Honors Capstone Thesis/Project is completed during the final four semesters (junior & senior levels) at OVU. MDS 5 (HNRS 310) is offered during the junior fall semester and earns one credit hour and counts toward graduate Honors Program requirements.

Junior Spring Semester - MDS 6 (HNRS 311)

Continued study, research and writing effort for the required MDS Honors Capstone Thesis/Project for all MDS Honors students. MDS 6 (HNRS 311) is offered during the junior spring semester and earns one credit hour and counts toward graduate Honors Program requirements.

Senior Fall Semester MDS 7 (HNRS 410)

Continued study, research and writing effort for the required MDS Honors Capstone Thesis/Project for all MDS Honors students. MDS 7 (HNRS 410) is offered during the senior fall semester and earns one credit hour and counts toward graduate Honors Program requirements.

Senior Spring Semester MDS 8 (HNRS 411)

Continued study, research and writing effort for the required MDS Honors Capstone Thesis/Project for all MDS Honors students. MDS 8 (HNRS 411) is offered during the senior spring semester and earns one credit hour and counts toward graduate Honors Program requirements.

The MDS Honors Learning ePortfolio (0 credits)

In the Metadisciplinary Studies Honors Program, the Honors Learning ePortfolio is a web-based assemblage of artifacts and reflective writing that records and contextualizes the student’s entire undergraduate encounter. The MDS Honors learning eportfolio empowers students to make correlations between and across courses and disciplines, as well as to connect the chasm amongst educational experiences inside and outside of college classrooms, all of which are indispensable for lifelong learning and international citizenship. All MDS Honors students will create and finish a learning eportfolio during their entire time at Ohio Valley University.

The MDS Co-Curricular Activities

In addition to the above coursework, students will be obligatory to partake in a minimum of three approved co-curricular activities each term of enrollment (fall and spring). This may involve international travel encounters, field trips to cultural sites, colloquia, reading circles, speaker series, service to the community and/or the world at large, and/or assistance to the Metadisciplinary Studies Honors Program and/or Ohio Valley University.

My Career Plan (MCR)

The My Career Plan creates an array of pathways for students to pursue—pathways toward college, pathways during college, and pathways beyond college. A personal My Career Plan establishes goals for students’ lives, vocations, and education that provides them direction.

The “first-year experiences” of the Metadisciplinary Studies Honors Program have contributed to how students experience “college life” in their first semesters. There is also a restructuring of the “front door” of the university so students can “start right” and consequently flourish and succeed more completely as learners. The MDS Honors Program links freshmen immediately to professors and a small group of other students, internships, and research opportunities. It endeavors to get students connected early and habitually to the right people and right resources.

ARCAngels

Student peer leaders, called ARC (Academic Resource Companions) Angels keep an eye on newbies, assisting them to form relationships on campus and supporting anyone who is having difficulty transitioning to independent university life.

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